A comparison between traditional and modern cattle farming

A comparison between traditional and modern cattle farming
In traditional cattle farming, the cows were a local breed. Nowadays, however, there is a new ‘modern’ breed of cow. The indigenous cows are small. But the pure-breed modern cows are larger and more productive than the traditional ones. Traditional cattle farming is a case of quantity over quality.
Rating: 
Video Duration: 
00:00
Creator: 
Sosthène Hitimana
Date: 
Saturday, March 24, 2018
Level: 
Youth
Description2: 

In traditional cattle farming, the cows were a local breed. Nowadays, however, there is a new ‘modern’ breed of cow. The indigenous cows are small. But the pure-breed modern cows are larger and more productive than the traditional ones. As the indigenous cattle move about the land, they destroy the fields, leading to clashes between the crop planters and cattle farmers. These tensions can be avoided by housing the cows in barns.

Cattle farmers of the traditional method spend all their time with the herd, which means they cannot invest in other forms of agriculture.Modern cattle farmers, on the other hand, fulfil many diverse roles. Let us not forget that farmers who set off on long journeys into the bush can turn into uncivilised, rude, arrogant bandit-types. When it comes to modern cattle farming, there is little opportunity for delinquency, as the farmers are occupied with other work.

 

Finally, let it be understood that traditional cattle farming is a case of quantity over quality, five local cows each capable of producing a daily litre of milk, which amounts to five litres of milk every day. Compare that with a single cow of the ‘productive’ breed, which alone creates 12 litres of milk every day, and is fed by a farmer working close to home, where he is also able to watch over his children’s education. Moreover, the traditional cattle farmer is not available to help with the cultivation of the land.

However, the modern farmer is useful in the struggle against hunger.

Thank you!

 

This English translation has been possible thanks to the PerMondo project: Free translation of websites and documents for non-profit organisations. A project managed by Mondo Agit. Translator: Andrew Christou.